July 10, 2018 / 7:20 PM / 4 months ago

U.S. regulators grappling with self-driving vehicle security

WASHINGTON, July 10 (Reuters) - In closed-door meetings last March, U.S. transportation regulators and others grappled with questions about whether police should have the power to disable self-driving cars and whether an automatic alert that a robo-taxi had been in a wreck could violate an occupant's privacy, a report released on Tuesday showed.

The 39-page-summary of the meetings involving U.S. Transportation Department officials and industry, labor, and advocacy groups illustrated the thicket of legal, safety and social issues that have to be worked out as companies such as Alphabet Inc's Waymo unit and General Motors Co gear up to deploy self-driving cars for public use.

Many participants in the meetings "agreed that it is a question of when, not if, there is a massive cyber security attack targeting" autonomous vehicles and said "planning exercises are needed to prepare for and mitigate a large-scale, potentially multimodal cyber security attack," according to the report.

Reporting by David Shepardson

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